3545cfcJack Pokrzywa, Director of Global Ground Vehicle Standards at SAE International discusses the importance of sharing specific Ground Vehicle Standards information dedicated to the European market and the many opportunities available to develop those standards and advance the mobility industry.

 

The objective of this newsletter is to provide information about new and existing standardisation efforts to engineers who do not directly participate in development but may need the information to make their product development work easier and better harmonised.

Why launch an e-newsletter dedicated to the European market? 
SAE International standards development programme includes around 600 committees, 8,500 expert members representing almost 3,000 companies. The programme has international reach and scope and the published standards have global application. The objective of the newsletter is to provide information about new and existing standardisation efforts to engineers who do not directly participate in development but may need the information to make their product development work easier and better harmonised.

What makes the European market specific?
SAE is working on many aspects of advanced technology standardisation such as connected vehicle, automated vehicle, wireless charging or cyber security. These standards cannot be developed in a regional or national vacuum but rather collaboratively. Our European newsletter is intended to share the necessary information with European stakeholders which includes EU regulators, European standards development organisations but most importantly – engineers. A good example was the collaboration with EU to amend the SAE refrigerant containment standards to satisfy EU requirements that prescribe maximum refrigerant leakage rates for mobile air conditioners in cars sold in Europe after 2008.

What makes Ground Vehicle standards a key element for the region and how crucial is SAE’s role?
Over several decades, SAE has developed a very efficient standardisation process which enables experts to quickly deliver common solutions in critical areas. It is a staged process where in some cases all that’s needed is an information report but in other cases, an SAE recommended practice or SAE standards are required. A good example will be Automotive Internet of Things where there are still many unknowns yet there is room for defining framework and foundation. In a case of automated vehicle levels (SAE J3016), certainly, a standard can provide a solid basis for the entire automotive world to work from. SAE believes in a multipath to international standardisation where our standards become global solutions for the industry, are adopted by other SDOs, or harmonised with other efforts.

Jack Pokrzywa is Director of Global Ground Vehicle Standards at SAE International

Leave a Comment